Monday, February 17th

[fblikesend]

Happy Monday, Front Porchers. Last week was a good week for us; on Thursday, Sam Baker, his band, and more than a hundred of our closest friends joined us for Actually Unplugged, and then Ray Benson preached at Parable on Sunday. But the action isn’t slowing down; the Southwest Showdown begins at 11:00 this Saturday. Come out to the Seminary of the Southwest’s annual family-friendly barbeque cook-off. Proceeds go Episcopal Relief and Development, and the inordinately talented Tessy Lou and the Shotgun Stars will accompany the Texas barbeque with Texas country music.

As the two or three of you who regularly read my posts know, I usually take this space to write about some notable figure or event linked to the day’s date. Today, as I scanned my top-secret historical calendar, I found some good stuff: in 1600, philosopher Giordano Bruno was executed; in 1819, the Missouri Compromise passed; in 1863, the Red Cross was founded; in 1929, Chaim Potok was born. But what about the billions of lives that don’t find their way into the annals of Wikipedia? We don’t read about, or even really think about, their experiences, their accomplishments, their fears and desires, but they existed, from the first sentient hominid to the aged farmer in third century BC Chile to the child just born into poverty in Mumbai. They are sparrows, just as we are, and their lives are as immediate to them as ours are to us, and every bit as important and dear. Once those lives are gone, those accomplishments and experiences stay with us, invisible and inaccessible but present nonetheless. That’s as good a reason as any to be kind, to pour out our souls, to give recklessly and fully, to love as hard and as much as we possibly can; we can leave something behind, an undetectable legacy of goodness that is better than an article in an online database.

Monday, February 10th

[fblikesend]

Happy Monday, Front Porchers. Have we got a week of events lined up for you. On Thursday, Sam Baker and his band play in All Saints’ church at 7:30. We’re really excited for Sam to bring his beautifully spare songs about loss, faith, and the human condition to Actually Unplugged for a Valentine’s special. On Sunday, we’ll welcome another titan of the central Texas music scene to a very different event: Ray Benson will be our featured preacher at Parable, ably interviewed by John Burnett. Don’t miss these thirteen plus feet of humanity at the Front Porch’s reimagined evening Eucharist service at Opal Divine’s on South Congress at 5:30 on Sunday.

Today marks the eighteenth anniversary of Deep Blue’s first victory over Garry Kasparov. I remember reading about this as a kid, and feeling a vague but powerful disappointment; I had just learned how to play and lose badly at chess, and here was its best player ever being rendered obsolete by a computer. Obviously, the trend didn’t stop there. The point of a machine is to do things that people can’t. Robotic hearts, various DARPA monstrosities, and even iPhones are moving well beyond human ken. It’s enough to make humans feel obsolete. Garry Kasparov himself retired from chess not long after, instead becoming  an active political dissident in Russia. He has run (unsuccessfully) for public office and been imprisoned for legally hazy reasons and spoken against corruption both inside and outside of his country. Whether you agree or disagree with his beliefs, he has moved into a place where machines, for now, can’t compete with him. There are all kinds of morals here, I think, but the one that I like best is that no matter how powerful and smart we build a computer, we can still do what we’ve been doing for our entire history as a species: create a place for ourselves where we can manufacture our own meaning.

Monday, February 3rd

[fblikesend]

Happy Monday, Front Porchers. We’ve got some big stuff coming up. Next week, the inimitable Sam Baker and his band play Actually Unplugged. As we’ve mentioned before, Sam’s unique minimalist folk stylings, paired with themes of faith, loss, and hard choices, make this a perfect date night for the evening before Valentine’s Day. Then, next Sunday, we’ll host Parable at Opal Divine’s. This time, Ray Benson will preach, with an assist from John Burnett. Don’t miss this alternative worship service, led by over thirteen feet of human being.

Today is also the one hundred and forty-third anniversary of the passing of the the Fifteenth Amendment, which guaranteed the right to vote regardless of race. As one of the most important amendments to the Constitution (here on the Porch, we’re also big fans of the Twenty-first), it’s pretty clearly a big deal for ensuring that democracy can reign. However,  it took nearly a century for this nation, founded on ideas of freedom, to create such a law demonstrates how often the ethically crucial is overlooked, intentionally or otherwise, until it becomes a pressing need. In honor of this, we invite you this week to think about yourself, your country, or any organization to which you pertain through this lens: What necessary things are we ignoring simply because we haven’t thought about them? What can we change that we didn’t even realize needed changing?