Monday, April 21st

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Happy Monday, Front Porchers, and happy one hundred and seventy-eighth anniversary of the Battle of San Jacinto. In celebration of such a landmark in the history of Texas, we’re featuring one of the landmarks of the Texas music scene this week at Unplugged on the Front Porch: Jimmie Dale Gilmore and Colin Gilmore will play Thursday at All Saints’ Episcopal Church.

It’s also the traditional date of the founding of Rome by Romulus and Remus. Of course, it was calculated by counting backwards through various mythological histories and is probably rather unreliable, considering that there is evidence of a walled human settlement on the site in the ninth century BC, but hey, it’s still pretty cool to think about tracing a civilization that dominated its world for three thousand years to a specific day. No? No one else thinks that’s really really cool? Dang. Well, it’s Patriot Day, too. Or the anniversary of the discovery of exoplanets. Or John Muir’s birthday. Or another day that the earth didn’t spin off its axis into the frigid void of space. Odds are you can find a good reason for this day to be pretty special one for you; want to share it?

Matthew Dow: Why I Front Porch

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Here’s Front Porch Board member Matthew Dow on why he does the Front Porch:

The Front Porch is about listening to others.  It’s about dialogue.  It’s about having a conversation, even with different folks from different backgrounds.  It’s about learning from one another.  It’s about community.  Without being religious, it’s about gathering with a group of people and searching and being surprised.  That’s why I am committed to the Front Porch.

Monday, April 14th

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Happy Monday, Front Porchers, and happy birthday to David G. Burnet, the first (albeit interim) president of the Republic of Texas. Speaking of Burnet(t)s, we’d like to thank John for once again MCing Parable with Austin jazz heavyweights Rabbi Neil Blumofe and Michael Mordecai. We’d like to thank all of you who came out, too. Also a big shout-out to Angie Cross for wrapping up our Lenten series Autobiographies of Redemption on Friday; if you didn’t hear her, you should check out her book The Butterfly Knight, which is alternately heartbreaking and uplifting. Looking ahead, Unplugged on the Front Porch is next Thursday, starring Jimmie Dale Gilmore and Colin Gilmore. It’s not like they need an introduction, but holy cow are they talented.

On a more sober note, our Executive Director/fearless leader Rev. Dr. Steve Kinney’s father is in ill health, so Steve will be in Houston for the next couple of days. If you could keep the Kinneys in your thoughts and/or prayers, we’d sure appreciate it.

Monday, April 7th

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Happy Monday, Front Porchers, and happy feast day of the Blessed Notker the Stammerer. (Sorry, but how often am I going to get a chance to type “the Blessed Notker the Stammerer” into my computer?) Thanks to everyone who came out to hear Bill Wigmore’s powerful story this past Friday. Next, consider this your official invitation to the last of our Autobiographies of Redemption. Our final speaker is Angie Cross, who is the author of The Butterfly Knight, a chronicle of her journey with her son, who has Goldenhar syndrome. Don’t miss her account of joy, despair, and love. Then, the brilliant jazz historian, singer, and scholar Rabbi Neil Blumofe will join us for Parable to discuss sacred music, the Pesach, and jazz. He’s not the only guest of note, though; trombonist Michael Mordecai, a founding member of Beto and the Fairlanes, will  share some of his talent with us as well.

On this day ninety-two years ago, US Secretary of the Interior Albert Fall illegally leased federal oil lands near Teapot Dome, Wyoming, to private companies. Besides making him wealthier to the tune of $500,000 (or roughly $6.6 million in today), the deal allowed Pan American Oil and Sinclair Oil to access to the untouched oil reserves for almost nothing and without any competitive bidding. The subsequent investigation lasted for seven years and finished with the oil companies evicted from the lands and Fall imprisoned for a year. The heads of the two oil companies served a combined six months in prison. Fortunately, such high-dollar white-collar crime has since been stamped out in this country and around the world.