Monday, April 7th

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Happy Monday, Front Porchers, and happy feast day of the Blessed Notker the Stammerer. (Sorry, but how often am I going to get a chance to type “the Blessed Notker the Stammerer” into my computer?) Thanks to everyone who came out to hear Bill Wigmore’s powerful story this past Friday. Next, consider this your official invitation to the last of our Autobiographies of Redemption. Our final speaker is Angie Cross, who is the author of The Butterfly Knight, a chronicle of her journey with her son, who has Goldenhar syndrome. Don’t miss her account of joy, despair, and love. Then, the brilliant jazz historian, singer, and scholar Rabbi Neil Blumofe will join us for Parable to discuss sacred music, the Pesach, and jazz. He’s not the only guest of note, though; trombonist Michael Mordecai, a founding member of Beto and the Fairlanes, will  share some of his talent with us as well.

On this day ninety-two years ago, US Secretary of the Interior Albert Fall illegally leased federal oil lands near Teapot Dome, Wyoming, to private companies. Besides making him wealthier to the tune of $500,000 (or roughly $6.6 million in today), the deal allowed Pan American Oil and Sinclair Oil to access to the untouched oil reserves for almost nothing and without any competitive bidding. The subsequent investigation lasted for seven years and finished with the oil companies evicted from the lands and Fall imprisoned for a year. The heads of the two oil companies served a combined six months in prison. Fortunately, such high-dollar white-collar crime has since been stamped out in this country and around the world.

Monday, March 31st

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Happy Monday, Front Porchers, and happy birthdays to Renée Descartes, JS Bach, Joseph Haydn, Nikolai Gogol, Octavio Paz, Cesar Chavez, and Al Gore. We’d like to give a big “thank you” to Jesse Sublett for sharing his story last Friday, and to everyone who came to listen. This week, we’ve got the Rev. Bill Wigmore, who is a priest and addiction expert, speaking at Autobiographies of Redemption. If you liked Jesse, you should definitely check out Bill.

In lieu of any writing, here’s a video of Selena, who was killed on this day in 1995. Go ahead and dance along. We’re not here to judge.

 

Monday, March 24th

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Happy Monday, Front Porchers, and thank you all so much. We raised $8,390 through Amplify Austin, which will be matched by an anonymous donor. Every one of you who gave is our hero. To celebrate, we’re going to continue with our scheduled programming. Hooray! On Friday, our series Autobiographies of Redemption continues with Jesse Sublett. Maybe you know him as the bassist for the Skunks, who helped found the Austin punk scene in the seventies. Maybe you know him as a rock-and-roll mystery novelist. But however you know him, you don’t want to miss his story.

Speaking of major stories, it was thirty-four years ago today that Archbishop Óscar Romero was assassinated while celebrating Mass in a hospital chapel in San Salvador. Archbishop Romero was an outspoken critic of the political violence and corruption of El Salvador during the 1970s. Although he began his ecclesiastic career as a moderate conservative, he adapted his views to better fit his setting, breaking decades of the Church’s silent approbation of the strong-arm tactics used by El Salvador’s government and allying himself with (but never joining) the liberation theology movement. While his extraordinary courage in the face of institutional menace made him famous, his courage in the face of change is just as commendable: when faced with an appalling situation, he did not simply do as his predecessors had done and withdraw from the arena. He investigated the repression, thought about it, and changed himself to better meet the challenge with which he was presented. The Vatican has begun the process of canonizing him, but a more fitting remembrance would be to face the facts and change oneself, as he did, to better serve the good and the true.